Rem Koolhaas

Rem Koolhaas [2001 © Jan Sprij]

Rem Koolhaas

Rem Koolhaas (NL) is an architect and a principal of OMA.

Originally a journalist and script writer, Rem Koolhaas was educated at the Architectural Association School in London 1968-1972, whenhe produced the Berlin Wall as Architecture (1970) and Exodus, or the Voluntary Prisoners of Architecture (1972). In 1972, he received a Harkness Fellowship for research in the United States, studied at Cornell University and then became visiting Fellow at the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies in New York. While in New York, he wrote Delirious New York, a Retroactive Manifesto for Manhattan, which was published in 1978.

Rem Koolhaas founded the Office for Metropolitan Architecture in 1975 with Elia and Zoe Zenghelis and Madelon Vriesendorp in London, and has been involved in building and urban planning projects ever since. In 1995, together with graphic designer Bruce Mau, he published SMLXL, a book that documents the work of OMA and Koolhaas’ interest in contemporary society, building and urban development.

Since 1995, Koolhaas is professor of architecture and urban design at Harvard University. He conducts design research into a focused investigation of current urban-architectural conditions in various parts of the world through the ongoing Project on the City, in its recent installment on the study of Roman Cities and West African urbanization.

The work of Koolhaas and the office has won several international awards, including the Pritzker Architecture Prize 2000, the RIBA Gold Medal 2004, Mies van der Rohe Award for the Netherlands Embassy Berlin 2005. At the end of 1994, a retrospective exhibition was held at the MOMA in New York: Rem Koolhaas and the Place of Public Architecture.

For V2_'s 2002 TransUrbanism, Lars Spuybroek meets Rem Koolhaas: Africa Comes First was published.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rem_Koolhaas
http://www.artandculture.com/users/49-rem-koolhaas#Overview

Office for Metropolitan Architecture: http://www.oma.eu/

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